Arcaid Images´s Annual Architectural Photography Awards

With an outstanding quality, 2016´s best images related to the world of architecture have already seen the light. Arcaid Images´s Annual Architectural Photography Awards already has an international reputation, in spite of its four years of existence, and it is the first time that a photograph of a historical building has been awarded. This year will be remembered especially by a scene of a urban tunnel for pedestrians made of brick walls in Finsbury Park (London – United Kingdom) next to one of the canals of the Thames River. The image, by British photographer Matt Emmett (author of the Forgotten Heritage website), immortalizes with a computer-processed image one of the passages designed by East London Waterworks Company in 1868.

For three days, from November 15th to 18th, attendees at the World Architecture Festival in Berlin (Germany) were able to see the selected finalists from one of the most prolific editions in terms of variety and quality of the photographs presented. The jury was formed by high-profile professionals such as Amy Croft (curator of Sto Werkstatt), Katy Harris (Foster + communication director) or Kai-Uwe Bergmann (BIG architect).

In the final selection it is possible to contemplate images of buildings and structures that unite its architectural elements to the adjacent landscape, people or scenarios, captured by objectives that are able to stop the time at the right moment to find a timeless work of art.

SESC Pompeia, San Pablo, Brazil. Architect: Lina Bo Bardi. Built in 1982, this cultural center was built by linking concrete towers with an old steel drum factory, through concrete walkways. Photographer: Iñigo Bujedo Aguirre.

SESC Pompeia, San Pablo, Brazil. Architect: Lina Bo Bardi. Built in 1982, this cultural center was built by linking concrete towers with an old steel drum factory, through concrete walkways. Photographer: Iñigo Bujedo Aguirre.

Tower of Shanghai. Architect: Gensler / Marshall Strabala. Photographer: Nick Almasy.

Tower of Shanghai. Architect: Gensler / Marshall Strabala. Photographer: Nick Almasy.

Vitra Shaudepot, Weil am Rhein, Germany. Architect: Herzog & de Meuron. Photographer: Julien Lanoo.

Vitra Shaudepot, Weil am Rhein, Germany. Architect: Herzog & de Meuron. Photographer: Julien Lanoo.

Musée des Confluences, Lyon, France. Architect: Coop Himmelb. Photographer: Fabrice Fouillet.

Musée des Confluences, Lyon, France. Architect: Coop Himmelb. Photographer: Fabrice Fouillet.

Olympic Stadium, Helsinki, Finland. Architects: Yrjo. Lindegren and Toivo Jäntti built this tower in 1938 to celebrate the 1940 Olympic Games - canceled due to World War II. The national stadium in Helsinki finally hosted the games in 1952. Its tower, in the photo, is 73 m high. Photographer: Sebastián Weiss.

Olympic Stadium, Helsinki, Finland. Architects: Yrjo. Lindegren and Toivo Jäntti built this tower in 1938 to celebrate the 1940 Olympic Games – canceled due to World War II. The national stadium in Helsinki finally hosted the games in 1952. Its tower, in the photo, is 73 m high. Photographer: Sebastián Weiss.

Baku National Stadium. Architect: ROSSETTI. Photographer: Victor Romero.

Baku National Stadium. Architect: ROSSETTI. Photographer: Victor Romero.

Offices of Wiel Arets Architects' Allianz in Zurich, Switzerland. Photographer: Adrien Barakat

Offices of Wiel Arets Architects’ Allianz in Zurich, Switzerland. Photographer: Adrien Barakat

Light installation known as Forest of Light, by Sou Fujimoto. Photographer: Laurian Ghinitoiu.

Light installation known as Forest of Light, by Sou Fujimoto. Photographer: Laurian Ghinitoiu.

Hygge House, in Winnipeg, Canada. Architects: Plain, projects: Pike, Urbanink. These “Hygge” cabins, using the Danish word, were built as heating pavilions on an online skating rink in Winnipeg. Photo: Paul Turang.

Hygge House, in Winnipeg, Canada. Architects: Plain, projects: Pike, Urbanink. These “Hygge” cabins, using the Danish word, were built as heating pavilions on an online skating rink in Winnipeg. Photo: Paul Turang.

Bruder Klaus country chapel, Mechernich-Wachendorf, Germany. Architect: Peter Zumthor. Photographer: Mark Wohlrab.

Bruder Klaus country chapel, Mechernich-Wachendorf, Germany. Architect: Peter Zumthor. Photographer: Mark Wohlrab.